Collect from 浼佷笟缃戠珯妯℃澘

Children

SEPTEMBER 30TH

a●nd some of them took the cou●rse of prudence and steamed away se●award. Two or three small craft ●were torn from their moorings and driven ashore;■ that similar accidents may bef/p>

Startup

SEPTEMBER 30TH

馻ll larger vessels was painfully evide●nced by an English steamer which lay high and● dry on the beach, where she had been wrecked i■n a norther a few weeks before. But a■ll things

Sun

SEPTEMBER 30TH

have an end, and so■ did the gale, which blew itself out ●after cleansing the city of all miasmatic i●mpurities, and rendering it healthy for a● while. The sea went down, and as soo

The Eiffel Tower

SEPTEMBER 30TH

n as the ■steamer on which they were to leave had■ completed her cargo and was ready for sea, t■he travelling trio went on board. An hour late●r they were moving over the dark water/p>

Water drops

SEPTEMBER 30TH

鰏 of the Gulf of Mexico, with t●heir faces turned in the direction of the eq●uator. CHAPTER XXVII. THE COATZ●ACOALCOS RIVER.—ISTHMUS OF TEHUANTEPEC■.—TEHUANTEPEC RAILWAY AND SH

Agfa

SEPTEMBER 30TH

IP-CANAL.—THE EAD●S SHIP-RAILWAY.—AN IDEA OF CORTEZ.—PL■ANS OF CAPTAIN EADS.—A RAILWAY●-CAR

Auto

SEPTEMBER 30TH

RIAGE WITH 1200 WHEELS.—SHIPS CAR●RIED IN TANKS.—ENGINEERING AND OT■HER FEATURES OF THE SHIP-R

Bald eagle

e road, turning

AILWAY.—MAHOGANY TRA■DE.—FIFTEEN THOUSAND DOLLARS FOR THREE LOGS.—F●RONTERA AND TABASCO.—RUI

Black swan

SEPTEMBER 30TH

NS OF ■PALENQUE.—LORILLARD CITY.—EXPLOR●ATIONS BY STEPHENS AND CHARNAY.—PAL■ACE OF PALENQUE.—TEMPLE OF THE CROSS.—T■EMPLE OF LORILLARD.—REMA

Camera

SEPTEMBER 30TH

ILLAR OF DEATH. The steamer on wh■ich our friends were embarked● was a small one engaged in the coasti■ng trade. She

Coffee

SEPTEMBER 30TH

rican ports where large vessels ■cannot go. On the morning after leaving Vera C■ruz she was off

Cookies

SEPTEMBER 30TH

the mouth of the Coat●zacoalcos River, and a little after sunrise sh■e crossed the bar and steam

DJ

SEPTEMBER 30TH

ed sl■owly against the current of that trop■ical stream. ON THE RIVER'S BA■NK. Dense forests, broken ●here and there by clearings, covered th/p>

Cubes

SEPTEMBER 30TH

鰁 banks of the river, and reminded our■ young friends of the Menam River, in S●iam, or the Me-Kong, in Cambodia. Thirty miles f■rom the mouth of t

Doors

SEPTEMBER 30TH

he river brought ■them to Minatitlan, a tumble-down villag■e or town with a few hundred inhabita

Matchbox

SEPTEMBER 30TH

n●ts, who are chiefly engaged in doing● nothing, if one is to judge by a●ppearances. The business of Mi■natitlan is not large, and is chiefly connect●ed with trade in mahogany and /p>

Freiburg

SEPTEMBER 30TH

鰋ther tropical woods. The river and the ●town have an international importanc■e, as they are [Pg 424] on the Isthmus o●f Teh

Henna

SEPTEMBER 30TH

uantepec, which has long be■en under consideration as th●e route for a canal to connect the Atlantic w

Home office

SEPTEMBER 30TH

i■th the Pacific. The width of the isthmus ●from ocean to ocean is 143 miles,● but by making use of the rivers on either ●side the length of a canal would be littl■e, if any, more t

iPad

SEPTEMBER 30TH

han 100 miles. The route has be■en surveyed at different times, nota●bly in 1870, by Captain Shufeldt ●of the United States Navy, who d

Matchbox

SEPTEMBER 30TH

eclar■ed that there was no insurmountab●le obstacle to the construction of a s●hip-canal. Recently the Mexican Government has ■given to an English company a concession f●or a railway across the Isthmu■s of Tehuantepec. One of t

Lynx

SEPTEMBER 30TH

he■ surveyors of this company was a passenger o●n the steamer with our friends, who fell into c●onversation with him during dinner, and lear●ned many things of interest. The e■ngine

Mac

SEPTEMBER 30TH

er told them that work was t●o begin immediately on the railway, an■d they hoped to have it completed by the end■ of 1889. Doctor Bronson recalled the fact ■that in 1842 a concessio

Notebook

SEPTEMBER 30TH

n wa■s granted [Pg 425] to Don Jos●é de Garay for the Tehuantepec Rai●lway, but nothing was accomplished, f■or the simple reason that the money for the w●ork could not be obtain

Thoughts

SEPTEMBER 30TH

ed. As soon ■as the Garay concession fell● through, the United States ●Government offered $15,000,000 for the ri●ght of way across the Isthmus of Tehua■ntepec, but the offer was dec

Office

SEPTEMBER 30TH

lined. During t●he California gold excitement a Tehuante■pec transit line was established. St■eamers ran between the isthmus and● San Francisco on the Pacific side, and to Ne■w York

Portrait

SEPTEMBER 30TH

and New Orleans on the Atlantic. ■Passengers were carried across th■e neck of land in stage-coaches. T●he enterprise proved unprofitable, and● was abandoned after a few years. ■A

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